Susanna P. Campbell

Assistant Professor, American University’s
School of International Service

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Summary
In this Book Talk Podcast, hosted by Gwenith Cross, Susanna P. Campbell speaks about her new book Global Governance and Local Peace: Accountability and Performance in International Peacebuilding. In this book, Campbell examines case studies from Burundi from 1999 to 2014 to address the war to peace transition over six distinct phases. Using 28 case studies, Campbell looks at the behaviors of International Organizations, International Non-Governmental Organizations, and Bi-lateral Donors to see how these groups are able to adapt and evolve. Both informal local accountability and formal accountability are key to these developments and influence how receptive organizations are to feedback. While this work focuses on Burundi, the research seeks to understand the behaviors of international actors and Campbell distinguishes herself by performing more than 90 interviews in other conflicted affected countries—the DRC, Nepal, South Sudan, and Sudan—to test and validate her theory. Campbell’s detailed approach offers listeners and readers great insight into the behaviour of country offices and how this impacts international peacebuilding efforts.

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About the Author
Susanna P. Campbell is an Assistant Professor at American University’s School of International Service, Washington DC. She has published extensively on international intervention in conflict-affected countries, focusing on how global governance organizations interact with the micro-dynamics of conflict and cooperation. Professor Campbell has been awarded scholarly and policy grants for her research, including from the United States Institute of Peace. She has led large evaluations of international intervention in conflict-affected countries, including for the United Nations and the World Bank, and conducted extensive fieldwork in sub-Saharan Africa and globally. Her scholarship has contributed to demonstrated policy change at the global and local levels.


Recorded March 2019